ABONECRONEDRONE

   


 

And, if he hears something, it's there! And, if he doesn't, it isn't because - if his ears aren't true he can't tell whether he should get rid of that rustle or that rumble or whatever it is. And, he was playing it and standardising it and then in about the third time through as it was going down on to the DAT to go off to the factory, he walked over the room, to pick up his cup of tea and went "huh! that wasn't there before!" So we completely freaked him out. But we knew then that it worked. If we could fool his ears, we could fool most peoples.

John:

Mmm... So the CD is a collection of six of these pieces. That first one that we heard - "The Drone" is your voice.

Sheila:

Yes.

John:

A couple of tracks of you just singing the drone.

Sheila:

Many, Many tracks of me ...

John:

The whole point is not just a drone, nothing is just a drone.

Sheila:

No.

John:

With the exception of a sign wave, which doesn't have harmonics.

Sheila:

No.

John:

But what are some of the other drones that are used here?

Sheila:

We've used digeridoo drone over the very familiar - what I call the McCrimmon drone on "ABoneCroneDrone II". The first time I used it was for the "Lament of McCrimmon/Song of the Banshee"on "Roots and Wings" and, I've used it a lot since on "Weaving" and "The Zen Kiss", I used it for "Waiting" and for "Kafi Noir". So people are used to hearing that drone. I think of it almost as my signature drone and, it's nice to open up a new world into something that familiar. We deliberately used familiar drones, so that listeners who were perhaps familiar with those albums, that hear this and open up the worlds in them, in these drones, can go back and hear "Waiting" or something with maybe new ears. Umm... other things we've done are, the harmonium, we've used just plain harmonium drone on "ABoneCroneDrone IV".