ABONECRONEDRONE

   


 

So we have the crone there as a symbol of the creator and, when you think about the divine and the connection to the divine, which I'm trying to invoke, you know, the feeling that, out of universal consciousness these melodies sing themselves into my ear and that I feel connected to some sort of higher intelligence - the very special feeling that that is. I know, many, many, people have the ability to, all of us have the ability to do it, if we try. So I am invoking the divine, the word crone because, she's obviously the creator. She's creating over this cauldron of bubbling things and, our definition for the divine is the creator - that's the only definition we have and it says something about the creative act that really there ought to be no barrier between artist and audience. To do that is to define, to deny the audience its creative and divine potential and that's why I'm trying to let people in on exactly what I hear. I want to give away all these secrets. I mean, I find drones irresistible to sing over and, because I'm listening to what people think of this album because, they are 50% of the creative equation, I find that a lot of people are coming back to me and saying "Oh, I started singing over it immediately I heard it" because they are, whether consciously or unconsciously, hearing things that they want to emulate and that's great.

John:

Well, I mean, there are lots of people who will say, it's important for the listener to be a part of my music and stuff but, in the case of ...

Sheila:

It's the taking it to an extreme, isn't it?

John:

Yeah! In the case of this music where the listeners can actually ...

Sheila:

It's, 'you compose it as you go'.

John:

... they can alter the sound a bit, you know, because, I mean, obviously the standing waves of all these harmonics, will fill a room if you play it at a loud enough volume and, as you eluded to before, you know, you will, as listener, change what you're hearing, or at least, how you're hearing these pieces.

Sheila:

Yeah!, Normally when I go into the studio, because I own my own recordings and I pay for them, I'm very worked out about what I want to do. I hate wasting money in a studio and not knowing what I want to do. So "Weaving" and "Zen Kiss" were homed over two years each and I knew exactly what we were doing. With this one, that wasn't possible at all. Although, Steve had worked on a lot of techniques that he thought might work when we got to the mix stage, we were really biting our nails because, we didn't know if we could create this living experience that I've been talking about and, the proof of the pudding was when the cutting engineer got hold of it because, you know, he's probably the best cutting engineer in the country - he cuts for Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush and he's a very talented man.