ABONECRONEDRONE

   


John:

Right.

Sheila:

Or whatever the hell that Grateful Dead record is.

John:

Oh really! I've never heard that one. I think it would have been easy to call the album "Drone" and, but it's nicer to get people thinking about it and so, with a nonsense word, they have to. And it also is easier for me to write down, just write down ABCD.

Sheila:

Well, that's the other thing. The ABCD suggests something encyclopaedic in its coverage of the drone. You know, like, here is a catalogue of what you can hear in this ostensibly very simple monotonous piece of music.

John:

Well, that's the other thing. The ABCD suggests something encyclopaedic in its coverage of the drone. You know, like, here is a catalogue of what you can hear in this ostensibly very simple monotonous piece of music.

Sheila:

Yeah, Yes, 'cos they are six, hopefully, accessible ways of getting you to tune into harmonics if you haven't been able to before. You know, it sounds obtuse as a concept, and yet I have tried to make it as accessible as possible without shouting the harmonics at you because in that you case, you know, you'd just have the subtlety of it drowned, but yes, the bones of the drones are the harmonics. I think, they're the things that are unseen and yet give them structure, in the way that bones give us structure in are unseen, and then the crone, yes, I think the crone is me, in a way. You know, this feisty crabby old woman, stirring this pot of uncompromising potential, that looks like gook and, yet manages to be something, you know, managing to come up with something. I think also this idea that the crone is a diabalised archetype for us. We have no positive, well certainly in England, we have very few positive archetypes for older women. The idea that women, once they lose their ability to have physical children have in some way outlived their purpose, is a very spurious one and, so the crone is a great representation of a woman who's having mental children and of that, you know, a wise seer, historian, singer of songs, 'layer out of the dead'. The person that presided over birth marriage and death and you know, the most important things of our life and probably dispensed a good bit of wisdom with it and, you know, and then the feisty nature of people like that who'd probably, you know, stand up and tell you what for, because they just had the experience, they weren't going to take any nonsense.