WEAVING MY
ANCESTORS' VOICES

 

 

 

 

   


John:

So it's almost like a mad woman, who is literally speaking in tongues.

Sheila:

Yes.

John:

All right, well it's going to be a pretty odd segue from one to the other but let's hear them, from the CD, "Weaving My Ancestors Voices". We'll begin with "Speaking in Tongues No.I" and then the medley of "Nana" and "The Dreaming". This is music from Sheila Chandra.

THE SONGS ARE PLAYED.

We've just heard two tracks, from the CD "Weaving My Ancestors Voices" - Sheila Chandra is my guest on tonight's edition of New Sounds, here at WNYC.FM and that last medley of two works, "Nana", a Spanish lullaby, which you may know from Manuel De Falla, a very classical sounding arrangement from earlier in the century and then Sheila Chandra's own, "The Dreaming". We proceeded that with "Speaking in Tongue No.I". We mentioned, sort of, the tabla bols as they're known, the syllables. You're actually - it sounded, to me, like you're actually throwing in some of your own. Is that right, or are you actually using just traditional syllables?

Sheila:

I occasionally throw in a sound of my own but I think the reason why some of those patterns are unfamiliar to you, is because their drawn from the South Indian dance tradition too. So if you haven't heard a lot of South Indian dance music then some of the syllables will be unfamiliar.

John:

Is that konnakol or?

Sheila:

Konnakol is the drumming but the dancers have even weirder syllables sometimes.

John:

Uhuh, Oh OK. Sheila Chandra is my guest. I'm John Schaefer and you're listening to New Sounds.

BREAK

John:

New Sounds Programme No.959. We're sampling some of the music from Sheila Chandra's album, "Weaving My Ancestors' Voices". It is our monthly new releases edition of the programme, of course and we're sampling just a single new release this time around. The next tune is called "The Enchantment". Is this also a, sort of, looking at the music of the British Isles?

Sheila:

Yes, and it's much more, heavily influenced that way. The idea was to produce a kind of fusion of structure rather than of obvious sounds, because it took me a while without - because I've had no formal training to be able to go into a classical concert and realise that someone was improvising on the, four line verse of lyric and melody that is familiar to singers to exemplify that particular raga.

John:

You mean a classical Indian performance? Yeah.